How the pheromones are produced?

In humans, pheromones are secreted in the skin by apocrine glands (sometimes called the glands of human smell). They are similar to glands that secrete sweat salt, but in contrast, the apocrine glands secrete – fatty substance.

 

Apocrine glands are more often associated with hairy body parts such as armpits and groin and are usually combined with eccrine glands that help the distribution of pheromone secretions. Apocrine glands become active at puberty with hair growth in the armpits and groin, which increases the surface area for diffusion of the pheromone. Apocrine glands become active at puberty with hair growth in the armpits and groin, which increases the surface area for diffusion of the pheromone.

 

Pheromones are changed by the substances released during metabolism – hormones, peptide chains, fats, sugars, etc., which secrete into the skin and can give us some information about the internal chemistry and health of the individual. Over time, the species are adapted and set up whole pheromone chemical communication system. Contemporary animal and insect species possess specialized system in which develope secretory glands and receptor mechanisms.

 

Long time ago, researchers discovered that the pheromones play an important role in people’s life. The main male pheromone that men unconsciously secrete to attract the opposite sex is called Androstenone and the one that women secrete – Androstenol. Due to the evolution of mankind these pheromones are secreted only when people sweat. This is definitely not the most desirable way to meet with a representative of the opposite sex. The action of bacteria can also affect the production of pheromones. For example, the pheromone Androstenone and Androstadienone can oxidize to Androstenone.

However, the bacteria is responsible for the bad smell that is associated with the body odor.

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